Saturday, May 18, 2024

Naples & Florida News

Clean Water Rights in...

Experts forecast that one other significant algae bloom could end in billions of...

The Emergence of an...

Sightings of Peter’s rock agamas have increased on Sanibel and Captiva since Hurricane...

Soul cleansing – Naples...

How much wine did the famous Spanish painter Pablo Picasso should drink to...

“Punting in Emergencies”

I used to be having coffee the opposite day with a young guy,...
HomePoliticsStruggling in polls,...

Struggling in polls, DeSantis seeks support from evangelicals on abortion

TALLAHASSEE — Courting evangelical voters in early nominating states, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis is trying to develop into politically reborn – turning his struggling Republican presidential bid fully toward faith-based conservatives. DeSantis has unveiled endorsements from dozens of pastors and spiritual activists and spent last weekend campaigning at several Iowa social conservative events, including the state’s major Faith and Freedom Coalition fall banquet. Leaning into his record in Florida, DeSantis touted having signed a ban on most abortions after six weeks – a measure whose fate will soon be decided by the state’s Supreme Court, where five of the seven justices are appointees of the governor. The ruling could help loosen former President Donald Trump’s powerful grip on evangelical voters, DeSantis supporters say. Trump holds a 30% lead in Iowa over DeSantis and a 42% margin nationwide amongst GOP voters, in keeping with Real Clear Politics’ poll averages. But at the same time as DeSantis was training his give attention to evangelicals, Trump called the governor’s signing of the six-week law “a terrible mistake,” heightening the divide between the previous president and his closest rival for the GOP nomination. Amongst likely Republican voters in Iowa’s first-in-the-nation caucuses in January, 80% described themselves as “pro-life” in a recent survey. DeSantis is selling himself to those voters, based on his Florida record. “We have also in Florida not only given lip service but we have put our money where our mouth is in terms of promoting a culture of life,” DeSantis told the Concerned Women for America’s Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., before heading to Iowa. “We signed the Heartbeat Protection Act … the strongest protections for the proper to life in the fashionable history of the state of Florida,” he added. “We have also stood up very strongly for religious liberty,” DeSantis portrayed faith-based voters as continuously under attack. “Considered one of our most foundational freedoms of all, the liberty to practice our faith, is coming under assault by leftist elites all across the country,” DeSantis said, adding “there’s a greater way forward… if we make the proper selections over these next 18 months.” Iowa looks to make or break DeSantis, but DeSantis is usually focused on January – and the Iowa caucuses, where he desperately must emerge as a viable alternative to Trump. DeSantis’ once-promising campaign has cut staff, blown through money, and altered campaign managers because the governor’s poll numbers fall further behind Trump. DeSantis’ prospects for overtaking Trump have dimmed even further, with polls showing him cratering in Latest Hampshire, the primary primary state that comes on the heels of the Iowa caucuses. DeSantis had led Trump in polling there earlier this 12 months but fell to fifth place within the crowded Republican field, in keeping with a brand new CNN-University of Latest Hampshire survey, his worst showing yet within the state. But abortion and social conservative voters are actually seen as a political lifeline. DeSantis’ strict abortion stance is out-of-step with polls within the U.S. and Florida, which show most voters support keeping abortion generally legal. But amongst Republicans, a majority of voters say they desire a candidate who will fight against abortion rights. Still, many Republicans acknowledge their party is alienating many citizens, especially suburban women, with the strict abortion position. Trump has told allies he sees the abortion issue as hurting Republican candidates. And he could have handed a political gift to DeSantis in Iowa during an appearance Sunday on NBC-TV’s Meet the Press when he said of the governor’s six-week ban, “I feel what he did is a terrible thing and a terrible mistake.” “You’re not going to win on this issue,” Trump said. Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, who DeSantis has said he’d consider as a running mate, also recently signed a six-week abortion law. ‘Tailor-made’ for Trump defeat “I feel Iowa is tailor-made to defeat Trump here within the Iowa caucuses, and I imagine this adds to it,” Bob Vander Plaats, president, and CEO of The Family Leader, an Iowa social conservative organization, told the USA TODAY NETWORK – Florida. “I imagine DeSantis and others are doing every part right… they’re constructing a company that may deliver on caucus night. I wouldn’t let the poll numbers principally sway anybody at this point,” added Vander Plaats, who plans to endorse a Republican candidate around Thanksgiving. Vander Plaats said Republicans appreciate what Trump did as president, particularly with the naming of three U.S. Supreme Court justices who helped overturn the Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide in 1973. But he said many GOP voters are actually “exhausted” by Trump and will be able to move on. Vander Plaats has endorsed the last three winners of the Iowa caucuses, none of whom went on to develop into the GOP presidential nominee. DeSantis’ campaign this summer poured $95,000 into the Family Leader Foundation for promoting, tickets, and events surrounding a July forum which Vander Plaats’ organization sponsored. Justices asked to reverse on privacy Abortion access on the road in Florida before DeSantis-heavy Supreme Court Waters prove deep for Florida candidates Like earlier Florida presidential hopefuls, DeSantis struggling in deep political water Trump has stayed away from the evangelical events in Iowa attended by DeSantis and lots of the large field of other Republican contenders. But the previous president is stepping up his give attention to Iowa, with two appearances Wednesday within the state. He can be spending $700,000 on promoting there this week, in keeping with AdImpact, the tracking firm. Some Trump advisers have said he’s in search of to finish DeSantis’ campaign in Iowa by clobbering the governor within the nominating contest. DeSantis’ abortion stance gives him an edge, supporters say Florida anti-abortion advocates say DeSantis has gained an edge over Trump on the problem. “These comments, among the many pro-life movement, are really going to cause a sea change,” said John Stemberger, president of the Florida Family Policy Council, which championed the state’s six-week law. “Lots of people just wish to be entertained and feel like someone is behind them and fighting for them,” Stemberger said of Trump. “But issues matter, and that is the defining issue, or must be, for Christians and social conservatives.” Florida’s current abortion law prohibits the procedure generally after 15 weeks of pregnancy. That law, which took effect last 12 months, was argued earlier this month before the state Supreme Court, with Planned Parenthood affiliates saying it violates Florida’s constitutional right to privacy. The court in 1989 said that privacy right safeguards abortion. However the conservative, DeSantis-heavy court is being asked to revisit that ruling and now determine that the voter-approved privacy law was never intended to guard abortion access. Florida lawmakers, anticipating that justices will side with the state’s arguments, last spring approved the six-week law, which is able to go into effect one month after a court ruling stripping away privacy protections. The timing of the court’s decision could help DeSantis grab one other headline underscoring his support for abortion restrictions, closer to the January caucuses in Iowa. “Unfortunately for Floridians, their right to have the liberty to make their very own private healthcare decisions has develop into just one other pawn in Ron DeSantis’ political ambitions,” said Anders Croy, spokesman for DeSantis Watch, a web site critical of the governor that’s backed by progressive nonprofit organizations. But Croy said a proposed constitutional amendment affirming the proper to abortion in Florida could share space on next November’s presidential ballot. The campaign is currently gathering signatures to place before voters a measure that would restore abortion access in Florida. “While the governor may imagine that a ruling upholding his abortion ban in Florida shall be a political win for him with far-right voters in Iowa, the actual fact is that Floridians could have the ultimate say next 12 months once they enshrine abortion rights into our state structure,” Croy said.

Advertisementspot_img

Continue reading

5 SEC Football Coaches Under the Most Pressure: From Billy Napier to Kalen DeBoer | Toppmeyer

Alabama's Kalen DeBoer enjoyed a hero's welcome after replacing Nick Saban, but come September, he'll face the pressure of constructing a powerful first impression. Billy Napier is 11-14 after two seasons at Florida. He desperately needs an upbeat narrative...

Rudy Giuliani served summons in Arizona for involvement in fake electors case

Rudy Giuliani was served Friday with a notice to seem in an Arizona court to reply charges stemming from an effort to maintain Donald Trump within the White House despite losing the 2020 election, based...

Meet Riley Oakes: FGCU Softball Outfielder in the Spotlight

Riley Oakes is a graduate center fielder for Florida Gulf Coast's softball team. The Oviedo...