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Best Times to Visit Orlando, Pensacola, Miami, and Tallahassee

What time is the solar eclipse, and what can we (potentially) see in Florida? The Great American Eclipse or the “ring of fireside” eclipse will happen on Saturday, October 14, 2023. Although Florida isn’t directly in the trail of annularity, residents of the Sunshine State will still have the chance to witness a partial solar eclipse, weather permitting. Here’s a breakdown of the timings and other necessary information to know.

When will the Great American Eclipse 2023 occur?
There are three notable solar eclipses that will probably be visible in the US. Following the Great American Solar Eclipse on August 21, 2017, the Great American Eclipse will occur on October 14, 2023, followed by the Total Solar Eclipse on April 8, 2024. Even individuals positioned a whole lot of miles outside the trail will have the option to witness the “ring of fireside” annular solar eclipse in October.

What time will the Great American Solar Eclipse, the “ring of fireside” solar eclipse, be visible in Florida?
Florida will experience a partial solar eclipse on October 14, 2023, starting at 10:38 a.m. CT/11:38 a.m. ET and ending at 3:13 p.m. ET, in response to timeanddate.com. Although Florida isn’t in the trail of annularity, skywatchers still have a 50 to 60 percent likelihood of seeing a phase of the annular eclipse, provided that the weather conditions are favorable.

What does the ring of fireside solar eclipse mean?
NASA explains that an annular solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and Earth while it’s at its farthest point from Earth. As a result of the moon being farther away, it appears smaller than the sun and doesn’t completely cover it. In keeping with NASA, the Great American Eclipse will probably be visible to hundreds of thousands across the globe because it passes through the northwestern United States, Mexico, Central America, and South America before exiting in Brazil. Even those outside the trail of annularity will still have the option to witness a partial solar eclipse if weather conditions permit.

Can the “ring of fireside” Great American Eclipse be seen in Florida?
To watch all of the phases of an annular eclipse, one should be throughout the path of annularity. The trail of annularity for the “ring of fireside” eclipse covers parts of Oregon, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Latest Mexico, and Texas, as shown on a map on greatamericaneclipse.com. Unfortunately, the ring of fireside effect is not going to be visible from Florida unless observed through a livestream.

What’s the timing for the Great American Eclipse in Florida?
The partial solar eclipse in Florida will begin at 10:38 a.m. CT/11:38 a.m. ET and end at 3:13 p.m. ET in response to timeanddate.com.

Listed here are the precise timings for various cities in Florida:

– Clearwater: 11:38 a.m. to three:02 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:24 p.m. Obscuration could be around 59% to 60% and average cloud cover is predicted to be around 41%.

– Pensacola: 10:39 a.m. to 1:49 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 12:11 p.m.

– Tallahassee: 11:44 a.m. to 2:53 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:17 p.m.

– Gainesville: 11:49 a.m. to 2:58 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:22 p.m.

– Tampa: 11:50 a.m. to three:02 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:25 p.m. Obscuration could be 58% and average cloud cover may reach 58%.

– Sarasota: 11:50 a.m. to three:04 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:26 p.m.

– Naples: 11:53 a.m. to three:08 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:29 p.m.

– Fort Myers: 11:52 a.m. to three:07 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:28 p.m.

– Lakeland: 11:51 a.m. to three:03 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:25 p.m.

– Ocala: 11:50 a.m. to 2:59 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:23 p.m.

– Orlando: 11:52 a.m. to three:02 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:26 p.m.

– Melbourne: 11:54 a.m. to three:04 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:28 p.m.

– Daytona Beach: 11:52 a.m. to three:01 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:25 p.m.

– Jacksonville: 11:50 a.m. to 2:57 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:22 p.m. Obscuration could be around 52% and average cloud cover could reach 66%.

– Vero Beach: 11:55 a.m. to three:06 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:29 p.m.

– Jensen Beach: 11:56 a.m. to three:07 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:31 p.m.

– Port St. Lucie: 11:55 a.m. to three:07 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:30 p.m.

– West Palm Beach: 11:56 a.m. to three:09 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:32 p.m.

– Fort Lauderdale: 11:57 a.m. to three:10 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:33 p.m. Obscuration could be 57% and average cloud cover might be 69%.

– Miami: 11:57 a.m. to three:11 p.m. ET, with maximum viewing at 1:33 p.m. Obscuration could be 57% and average cloud cover could reach 62%.

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